Category Archives: Food

Holiday Cookies!

Jem Written by Jem

I love baking. Cookies are one of the easiest baked goods to prepare. And with the holidays in full force it is high time that you got into that kitchen of yours and preheated that oven and got to making some Holiday Cookies!

At my house growing up we always had the tradition of having family members over and all of the kids would gather around the kitchen and decorate sugar cookies with lots of colored sugars and jimmies and all sort of other pretty decorations. They usually looked like a mess afterwards and I don’t know if we ever ate all of them. But the act of it was festive enough for me!

I’ve pulled some fun holiday cookie recipes for ya’ll to try out this month!

 

Shortbread cookies – are by far my favorite cookies to make any time of the year, but this version makes it just a little bit more festive – probably even more so if you used colored sugars!

I love this holiday take on a cookie classic. I remember I used to get the original kind in the cookie aisle – but come to think of it I haven’t seen them in awhile – I wonder if they are still around? Either way, this cute ‘Shirley Temple’ is fun!

The holidays wouldn’t be complete without lots of excessive alcohol added into every sweet dish possible! These bourbon balls are doing it right by adding the colored sprinkles onto this potent cookie.

Now these I love for multiple reasons, I love myself some beets – in any form, and I love how the beets naturally turn these cookies into a fun holiday hue. I’m not sure I’ve ever had the original Rugelach myself but according to my findings these are very much a holiday favorite! 

Well whichever path you take this holiday season. Get to making something sweet and tasty for all of your loved ones – and of course pop a few of the right out of the oven ones for yourself!

Partying in the 60s the Canadian Way!

Jem Written by Jem

1960s Canadian Party Cookbook

I found this beautifully illustrated miniature paper cookbook on etsy a couple of weeks ago and knew I had to review it for our blog over here. It was written by a Canadian brewing company and has some very fun and creative ideas of how to entertain using different kinds of beer as the center piece. Getting creative with beer has never seemed so elegant thanks to this cookbook.

It’s chock full of recipes usually centered around different kinds of parties you can have,  I will be going through them each week till the end, so you can have some party inspiration to last you all year long!

The first installment is getting the basics down! The first couple of pages inside the book give you the low-down on pulling together a party and giving you a little insight into the Canadian way!

p.s. if you are having trouble seeing the images at this size – simply click not the image and it will bring you to the larger size!

1960s Canadian Party Cookbook

The introductory page lets you in on the ultra hip modern Canadian lifestyle and how they like to party almost any time of the year. 

1960s Canadian Party Cookbook

The 2nd page is all about planning here are their tips :

  1. Plan guest list carefully.
  2. Complete guest list early so you know how many to plan for.
  3. Write your plan on paper!
  4. Decide on a Theme.
  5. Plan Menu one week before, and don’t make anything you haven’t prepared before.
  6. Do Party shopping far enough ahead.
  7. Prepare as much food ahead as possible.
  8. Position beverage bar away from area where food is served.
  9. Use one large dramatic decor instead of multiple small ones.
  10. As the hostess you are responsible for keeping the party moving!

1960s Canadian Party Cookbook
1960s Canadian Party Cookbook

The Final two pages in the introductory section give you all the fine dining tips of a beer connoisseur so that you will never mistakenly serve it incorrectly. Here are a few of the tips :

  1. Serve ale and lager in attractive beer glasses, the Stein is more suitable for outdoors or game room parties where everyone is on the move.
  2. Beer should be served at a temperature from 42 to 45 degrees, normally you will find this temperature on the bottom shelf of your refrigerator.
  3. For smoother, more enjoyable beer it should be poured with a proper head. Hold the glass upright and allow the beer to splash down the centre of the glass. If the head builds up too rapidly, decrease the flow. If the head is not growing fast enough, hold the bottle perpendicularly over the glass and allow the remainder to splash down and froth around.
  4. Beer glasses should never be washed with soap since the fat from soap leaves invisible traces on the glass which will cut down the beer head. After washing in hot water with detergent, the beer glass should be rinsed in cold water and turned upside down to drain. Some connoisseurs even insist on finishing glasses in a hot water and salt solution, then in clear water – then drain dry without wiping.

Now that you are all prepped and ready to get down to Party Planning, here are a couple of beer related pieces to get you on your way to hosting the most fabulous party!

 

60s Amber Continental Can Company Beer Pitcher Set with Four (4) Tall Depression Glass Tavern Mugs
Vintage set of 4 Amber American Eagle Crest Beer Mug Glass Stein

Can’t go wrong with some classic 60s amber beer glasses.

(click the images to go to their etsy page!)

Awesome Vintage Bakelite Bottle Opener - Butterscotch Swirl - Can Opener - 60s Barware

A lovely bakelite bottle opener for all opening all of your beer bottles with class and dignity!

Vintage 60s Olde Canhardware Insulated Pewter Beer Stein Ice Bucket

And finally this lovely pewter stein ice canteen, would look lovely as a piece for your barware set.

Well that’s all for now folks! Until my next installment – have fun party prepping!

Vintage Cookware.

Nicki Written by Nicki

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Yesterday we shared with you Georges Briard’s fantastic pineapple cookware, and with Thanksgiving coming up we figured we would continue with our cookware theme! Today I’ve pooled together some favorites from Etsy. Vintage cookware is so vibrant and fun. It really brightens up any kitchen! This beautiful lotus/diamond pattern (above) was quite popular in the 60s and 70s. I can see why, it’s adorable!

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These pots and pans have the greatest combination of colors and patterns! I’m working on decking out my kitchen with vintage goods, but so far all I’ve got is a green floral Pyrex bowl and a set of cocktail glasses from the early 60s.

This little beauty is my favorite. Anything with a fruit print obviously gets a thumbs up from Seven Minutes in Heaven!

Mad about Georges Briard’s Pineapples!

Jem Written by Jem

Earlier this year I had a pretty strong love affair with all things fruit and tropical related. I was running around like a mad man trying to find pieces to add to my wardrobe that included ‘pineapples’ ‘parrots’ or anything that resembled ‘paradise’! After a couple of hours searching I kept coming across these beautiful kitchen-ware pieces.

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Upon reading a bit up on them it turns out they were created by Jascha Brojdo who went under the named Georges Briard to mark his ‘commercial’ pieces. His pieces were big in the 50s, 60s, and 70s and sold at places like Neiman Marcus and Bonwit Teller. His pieces are generally signed and come in a variety of kitchen and household items – you have probably seen his glasses/cups at some point at a thrift store or flea market you’ve been to.

Frankly I just loved the pineapples, (check out my sweet pineapple manicure I’m currently sporting!) and could EASLIY see me being one of those brides that requests to have all matching pieces for my registry! “Yes you have to go on etsy to see my registry!, do it! DO IT!!!..I must have all my precious!” ….okay you see I went a little crazy there.. But I am serious about my entertaining pieces I told you!

In closing, I will leave you with another bigger collection of Mr. Briard’s pieces for you to ogle over and possibly purchase – thanks to his extensive popularity on my favorite website (other than this one of course) Etsy!

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Laziness Celebrated with Susan!

Jem Written by Jem

1960s Table Spread

I was in a vintage shop this past month (surprise, surprise!) and stumbled upon what I originally thought was a simple tin platter dish, and was quite surprised when I realized it spun around in a circle.

Lazy Susan

What had I discovered, but a Lazy Susan!

I don’t know about you guys, but it had felt like forever since I had seen one in action. I remembered the one from my childhood (late 80s early 90s) being a part of the kitchen table set up, and my mother had another double stacked version in the cupboard for her spices. But In her current home, and that of any relative or spouse’s family member whose house I had the privilege to be at I can’t recall noticing one.

The last time I remembered seeing one in use was at a chinese restaurant back when I lived in Chicago in the early 2000s.

Vintage Tv Dinner

Where had all of the Lazy Susan’s gone? My thoughts immediately go to the fact that less and less people eat dinner at the dinner table with a full family, and that could possible warrant less relevancy of such a kitchen accessory. But I’ve considered it to be such a great piece to add to your kitchen table or counter top to collect your most used spices, or oils and vinegars, possibly napkins and misc. pieces like decorative straws?

On Etsy the options are nearly endless. Almost 2000+ options show up. And the fact that it’s history is some-what of a mystery is also an interesting piece of it’s puzzle.

60s Table Layout

So what else to do with all of this information, but to pluck through the listings and search out the best 60s/70s versions of ‘Susan’ to share with our readers looking to give their Thanksgiving / Holiday tables a little of that vintage charm!

Here are my favorite picks :

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I’m primarily a fan of the flat versions with the fun mod and psychedelic patterns or designs on the top. It would look pretty swanky especially if you topped it with dishes that were made of glass! Also these would make great cake stands as well, taking a slice of cake and get a beautiful design underneath as an extra treat! The sort with the separated dishes would be an easy way to spruce up a veggie platter – source the dip in the center of course!

Henry Ford's Lazy Susan

I will leave you with Henry Ford’s use for the Lazy Susan. Leave the help and servants at home while camping and serve everyone on this gigantic scaled Lazy Susan. Man after my own heart, he doesn’t take entertaining lightly – no matter where the setting!

 

Cooking Vintage Recipes. ( 60s / 70s )

Jem Written by Jem

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Being a fan of all things Vintage, and loving to cook every day – it’s natural that I may one day mix the two hobbies. I have decided to try out a new past-time here on SMIH, with experimenting using Vintage recipes and bringing them up-to-date with my pescatarian diet. I probably will occasionally make some of them into vegan/vegetarian as well, as I like to give myself a challenge.

Until I acquire some of my own cookbooks, I will be using the aid of the internet to source recipes. So far I have had good look, check out the Vintage Recipes I found below!

1960s Cocktail placemat

The Retro Housewife has amassed a fine collection of 1960s specific recipes, including : Mistletoe Dip, Charlotte Russe, and Big Top Circus Cake.

Hey My Mom Used to Make That‘  showcases some 1960s food and beverage recipes, with their original accompanying advertisements!

Psychedelic Cookbook

I absolutely love this Psychedelic Dessert Cookbook, the etsy gives you a preview of an awesome cake that uses assorted sized gum drops to make flowers!

Or maybe I can splurge and buy these Chicken/Turkey Molds, which go along with this ad Kitchen Retro found that shows how they were used back in the day! Make Seitan turkeys for thanksgiving?!

And of course every vintage kitchen isn’t complete without it’s very own aspic collection! Now here is where a vegan recipe would be interesting since most aspics use gelatin, using a vegan substitute like Agar, Carrageen, or Kosher Gelatin. Let’s see what I can get into! Honestly this may be one of the first things I make because it is odd looking, and I would love to force people to eat it’s strangeness!

1960s Hostess Cookbook

 Couldn’t go wrong with picking up this ‘Hostess’ cookbook from the 60s! I love the description : “Chapters cover “Gay Supper Parties,” “Easy Little Dinners,” “Bright Little Brunches and Lunches,” “Teas and Receptions,” holidays, patio parties, and more.”  I want to host a ‘Bright Little Brunch’ !

Speedy Orange Cake

This ‘Speedy Orange Cake’ from Recipe Vintage – looks like an easy go to cake!

1960s recipe card

Peggy’s Antiquated Recipes‘ gives a run-down of a collection of 1960s Cookbooks and includes a couple recipes including : Cheesy Pups, Ramequins, and Pink Lady Pie.

Let me know if you have any 60s/70s recipes that you want to share! I would love to test them out for the blog!

Bento Love.

Jem Written by Jem

Bento Boxes! I have loved making these fun japanese lunches for over a decade now! Usually whenever I am trying to eat healthier or more economically.

What is a Bento Box? Well I would explain it as a full meal made into a box or many small containers. Here is the wiki definition : Bento (弁当 bentō?)[1] is a single-portion takeout or home-packed meal common in Japanese cuisine.

Bento

The most common place (in america) you may have seen one is at a sushi or japanese restaurant. They usually offer a bento box that is one big plate / container separated into many compartments and each holding a different food item. Usually a sushi roll, some dumplings, rice, salad, and the main course. (I highly recommend ordering one next time you go out, they are so filling and usually a great deal)!

 

Bento Supplies via Wendy Copley

 

Bento Supplies via Wendy Copley